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HaT

Set 6008

Visigoths

Click for larger image
All figures are supplied unpainted    (Numbers of each pose in brackets)
Stats
Date Released 2002
Contents 24 figures
Poses 4 poses
Material Plastic (Medium Consistency)
Colours Tan
Average Height 24 mm (= 1.73 m)

Review

The Visigoths lived in the region we would recognise as south-western France and Spain. Prior to the settlement there they had been a sometime ally sometime enemy of Rome, and in 410 CE they famously sacked Rome itself under their leader Alaric.

This set is part of the mini-box series, and contains 24 figures in just four poses. HaT have said this is to reduce the production cost, and therefore allow them to manufacture sets on subjects that would otherwise not have been seen as economic to produce at all. Clearly not everyone will be happy with the resulting limited set, but at least it could be argued that four poses are better than none at all.

The appearance of the Visigoths could be said to be typical of the many Germanic peoples that eventually flooded into the Western Roman Empire and settled there. Like many Celts they grew their hair long, though they tended to trim their beards. Clothing was a simple tunic and trousers, sometimes augmented by a fur jerkin or cloak in cold weather. This costume is correctly reflected in these figures.

The Visigoths made more use of the bow than many other 'barbarians', and the archer depicted here is quite nicely done, though we would have expected him to have a personal weapon such as a sword or knife in addition. The man with spear raised is somewhat ungainly as he has managed to hold his spear directly over his head, and indeed his whole right arm seems to be in a position which this reviewer for one finds cannot be reproduced with real flesh and bone. The swordsman is also the proud possessor of an unusual anatomy, with his left hip protruding in the manner that would suggest a defect from birth.

As with their near neighbours, round or oval shields were the main protection, but two of these men carry coffin-like examples. As usual there is little clear evidence, and there is some doubt as to whether such shields were used, so no one can say for certain if these are correct or not. Also the shield bosses in this set have spikes, which does not appear to be supported by the evidence.

Detail is fair and there is little excess plastic. Apart from the awkward anatomy on some, these are reasonable models to pit against the dwindling armies of late Imperial Rome.


Ratings

Historical Accuracy 8
Pose Quality 4
Pose Number 1
Sculpting 5
Mould 8

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